Seminar Series for Michaelmas Term 2017 

Tuesdays 2.30 to 4.00 pm.

Refreshments available from 2pm. All welcome.

Find Us

 

 

A series of seminars designed to give scholars and graduate students a chance to present their in-progress research. Time is allocated for asking questions and sharing comments.

You can download the seminar programme by simply clicking the button or you can browse the titles and abstracts below.

 

FULL PROGRAMME


From the Venerable Bede to George Sale, Gentleman: Glimpses of the History of European Engagement with Islam as reflected in the Collections of the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford

Abstract

When the Bodleian Library opened in 1602 it held a single Arabic manuscript - a copy of the Qur’an. 350 years later, it held over 10,000 manuscript works in Arabic, Persian and Turkish. This illustrated seminar highlights some of the Bodleian’s rich collections – both Oriental and Western – as a window onto the history of European knowledge of and, engagement with, Islam and the Islamic world.
PLEASE NOTE - this seminar only to be held on a MONDAY

Towards Building a Muslim Theology of Religions:
Salvation in the Islamic Tradition in conversation with the Christian discussion of exclusivism, inclusivism and pluralism

Abstract

This seminar traces the historical development of the Muslim discussion on 'salvation'. The discussion is divided into three main phases: the formative period of Islam, the mediaeval period, culminating in the modern period. The proposed thesis seeks to solidify the Muslim Theology of Religions, benefiting from a well-established Christian one. While it aims to do this, it questions the applicability of the Threefold Typology: exclusivism, inclusivism and pluralism to the Muslim traditions.
Experiencing Qur’anic studies research as a Christian: the Qur’an as a theology of signs?

Writing the History of the Muslim Conquest of Egypt

Abstract


This paper explores the Arab conquest of Egypt, and its immediate aftermath, through two sets of sources: the earliest Christian narrative of the conquest; and a series of spectacular but neglected documentary archives from the first decades of Arab rule. In this it seeks an alternative route into the earliest interactions of conqueror and conquered, beyond those provided in later Arabic texts.
Exploring the role of women in Christian mission in Syria and Egypt from 1860-1930s through the MECO Archive in the CMCS Library